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http://capitalpress.com/main.asp?SectionID=67&SubSectionID=616&ArticleID=48727&TM=80353.77

Klamath Bull and Horse sale brings in more than $300K

Tim Hearden, Capital Press 2/12/09

The sluggish economy didn't stop farmers and ranchers from spending more than $300,000 at last weekend's Klamath Bull and Horse Sale in Klamath Falls, Ore.

In all, 113 bulls and 22 horses were auctioned off Saturday, Feb. 7, in the Klamath County Fairgrounds' Event Center.

Bulls brought in $244,050, including $162,700 for the 72 Angus bulls brought to the sale. The average price was $2,160 for all the bulls, and $2,260 for the Angus bulls.

Horses registered a combined $56,575 in sales for an average of $2,694. The top seller was a sorrel mare that went for $6,100.

Many of the hundreds of attendees at the 49th annual bull sale were wondering how the nation's economic woes will affect the cattle industry, according to a published report.

Event chairman Nathan Jackson said before the sale that the drought in California may put a damper on local prices.

"It definitely affects us," he said. "There's a lot of these calves that go to California. If folks in California don't have grass, they don't buy our calves. A lot of people summer cattle up here and winter them in Red Bluff and Northern California."

Saturday's sale was the culmination of four days of activity, Feb. 4-7. The activities included a Western trade show, ranch roping, stock horse and other contests and a barbecue dinner.

Some attendees had continued on to Klamath Falls from the Red Bluff Bull and Gelding Sale, which registered more than $1.5 million in sales of bulls, cows, horses and dogs a week earlier.

The number of horses and bulls catalogued at the Klamath sale were down a bit from last year, Jackson said. Several years ago, the sale committee instituted a no-yearlings policy for horses, which kept numbers down, he said.

The Klamath sale is a fun event for families, Jackson said.

"It's a good time to just go and look and have a good time," he said, "whether you're there to buy a bull or not."

Staff writer Tim Hearden is based in Shasta Lake. E-mail: thearden@capitalpress.com.

Sale results
Here are some results from the Klamath Bull and Horse Sale Feb. 7 in Klamath Falls, Ore.:

Bulls - Angus, 72 bulls, $162,700 total sale, average $2,259 per bull; Charolais, 2 bulls, $3,800 total sale, average $1,900 per bull; Chlangus, 1 bull, $1,600; Gelbvieh-Balancer, 1 bull, $1,800; Hereford, 18 bulls, $36,200 total sale, average $2011.11 per bull; Limousin, 1 bull, $2,900; Polled Hereford, 4 bulls, $8,300 total sale, average $2,075 per bull; Red Angus, 2 bulls, $2,900 total sale, average $1,450 per bull; Shorthorn, 1 bull, $3,900; Simmental, 11 bulls, $19,950 total sale, average $1,813.64 per bull; total 113 bulls, $244,050 total sale, average $2,159.73 per bull.

Horses - 22 horses, $56,575 total sale, average $2,694 per horse. Top sellers - 1. Sorrel mare, Cory Shelman to Paul Arritloa, $6,100; 2. Bay gelding, Frances Robertson to Lisa Newman, $5,000; 3. Chestnut mare, Luis Moya to John Flynn, $4,000.

 


 

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