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National Water Resources Association

2005 MEETING DATES

Annual Conference: November 7-10

2006 MEETING DATES

Federal Water Seminar: April 3-5

Date:

September 23, 2005

To:

NWRA Members, Congressional and Federal Staff, Washington Representatives

From:

Peter Adams, Legislative Assistant

The NWRA Daily News is a collection of press releases, news articles and other Western water related issue items prepared for and circulated to members of the National Water Resources Association (NWRA), Congressional and Federal Staff and Washington Representatives each business day. Those receiving the NWRA Daily Report are encouraged to submit news items to the NWRA office for inclusion in the Daily. Should you have an article you would like circulated, please e-mail our office at nwra@nwra.org or fax our office at (703) 524-1548, if you have any questions, please call (703) 524-1544.

 

Table of Contents



 

NOTICE:

  1. ESA VICTORY!! LEGISLATION PASSES HOUSE RESOURCES COMMITTEE



CONGRESSIONAL PRESS RELEASES:

  1. BIPARTISAN THREATENED AND ENDANGERED SPECIES RECOVERY ACT OF 2005:
  2. DOMENICI ENCOURAGES INNOVATION WITH GROUP DEVELOPING ENERGY-WATER SOLUTIONS
  3. RENZI PUSHES FOR IMPROVEMENTS TO ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT:



AGENCY PRESS RELEASES:

  1. NORTON ANNOUNCES FUNDING FOR WETLANDS PROJECTS, ADDITIONS TO NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGES
  2. NATIONAL PUBLIC LANDS DAY ADVISORY (NPS DIRECTOR AND COMMISSIONER KEYS)



NEWS ARTICLES:

  1. REWRITE OF ENDANGERED SPECIES LAW APPROVED
  2. THE BATTLE BEGINS OVER ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT
  3. WOMEN IN COASTAL AREAS ARE FOUND TO HAVE HIGHER MERCURY LEVELS
  4. TOMORROW MARKS THAT THIS LAND IS YOUR LAND
  5. WHO YOU REALLY WANT RUNNING A FEDERAL AGENCY
  6. PAYING FOR KATRINA
  7. "GLOBAL WARMING" FORCING WESTERNERS TO ADAPT
  8. NEXT PHASE IN PROTECTING SPECIES: LIVING WITH THEM



 

NOTICE:

1. ESA VICTORY!! LEGISLATION PASSES HOUSE RESOURCES COMMITTEE

Van Ness Feldman

September 22, 2005

Late this afternoon, the House Resources Committee voted to report to the House of Representatives a bipartisan proposal to bring important updates and improvements to the Endangered Species Act. The House Resources Committee passed H.R. 3824, the "Threatened and Endangered Species Recovery Act of 2005," by a vote of 26-12.

Members of the Resources Committee voted as follows:

MEMBERS VOTING IN SUPPORT OF H.R. 3824 (26)

Chairman Richard Pombo (R-CA)*

Rep. Ken Calvert (R-CA)*

Rep. Barbara Cubin (R-WY)*

Rep. George Radanovich (R-CA)*

Rep. Chris Cannon (R-UT)*

Rep. Jim Gibbons (R-NV)*

Rep. Greg Walden (R-OR)*

Rep. Thomas Tancredo (R-CO)*

Rep. J.D. Hayworth (R-AZ)*

Rep. Jeff Flake (R-AZ)*

Rep. Rick Renzi (R-AZ)*

Rep. Steve Pearce (R-NM)*

Rep. Henry Brown (R-SC)*

Rep. Thelma Drake (R-VA)*

Del. Luis Fortuno (R-PR)

Rep. Cathy McMorris (R-WA)*

Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX)*

Rep. Marylin Musgrave (R-CO)

Del. Eli Faleomavaega (D-AS)

Rep. Neil Abercrombie (D-HI)

Del. Madeleine Bordallo (D-GU)

Rep. Jim Costa (D-CA)*

Rep. Charles Melancon (D-LA)*

Rep. Dan Boren (D-OK)*

Rep. Dennis Cardoza (D-CA)*

Rep. Stephanie Herseth (D-SD)

MEMBERS VOTING AGAINST H.R. 3824 (12)

Ranking Member Nick Rahall (D-WV)

Rep. Dale Kildee (D-MI)

Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ)

Rep. Grace Napolitano (D-CA)

Rep. Tom Udall (D-NM)

Rep. Raul Grijalva (D-AZ)

Rep. George Miller (D-CA)

Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-OR)

Rep. Jay Inslee (D-WA)

Rep. Mark Udall (D-CO)

Rep. Jim Saxton (R-NJ)

Rep. Wayne Gilchrest (R-MD)

MEMBERS NOT IN ATTENDANCE (10)

Rep. Don Young (R-AK)*

Rep. Elton Gallegly (R-CA)

Rep. John Duncan (R-TN)*

Rep. Walter Jones (R-NC)

Rep. John Peterson (R-PA)*

Rep. Bobby Jindal (R-LA)*

Rep. Solomon Ortiz (D-TX)

Del. Donna Christensen (D-VI)

Rep. Ron Kind (D-WI)

Rep. Ed Markey (D-MA)

* cosponsor of H.R. 3824

A copy of the House Resources Committee press release on the markup may be found at http://resourcescommittee.house.gov/Press/releases/2005/0922TESRApassage .htm.

H.R. 3824 could be taken up by the full House of Representatives as early as next week. We will pass along additional information regarding floor action as soon as it is announced.

In order to be prepared for the debate once the bill is taken up on the House floor, there is still much work to be done. Please continue sending written communications to the House Resources Committee and contacting Representatives to urge support and cosponsorship of this legislation. Please send an electronic copy of your letter to the Coalition at jas@vnf.com. and to Kristin Shrader on the Committee staff at kristin.schrader@mail.house.gov, or send the letter via fax to Kristin at (202) 226-4631.

As always, please feel free to contact us with any questions.

CONGRESSIONAL PRESS RELEASES:

2. BIPARTISAN THREATENED AND ENDANGERED SPECIES RECOVERY ACT OF 2005:

Approved Overwhelmingly by Committee

For Immediate Release:

September 22, 2005

Contact: Brian Kennedy at (202) 226-9019

Washington, DC - The House Committee on Resources overwhelmingly approved the Threatened and Endangered Species Recovery Act (TESRA) of 2005 today by a bipartisan vote, 26-12.

Background and Need of TESRA

"Having this much bipartisan support coming from the committee sends a very strong signal to the rest of the House," Chairman Pombo said. "Improving this law for the 21st century has become a conservative, liberal and commonsense cause for this Congress. This bill will help turn three decades of conflict into real cooperation for species conservation and recovery."

Rep. Dennis Cardoza (D-CA):

"I am co-sponsoring the Endangered Species Recovery Act because I believe the ESA should be enhanced and refocused on its original goal - species recovery. Since the passage of the ESA over 30 years ago, it has been diverted from that goal, and is increasingly driven by litigation, not science. I am confident that this bill will strengthen the ability of ESA to recover species, while reducing the burden on local economies and landowners."

Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX):

"It is high time that we act to correct yet another piece of well intentioned legislation that has transformed our environmental policies into a legal nightmare for private landowners. Hopefully, this will reintroduce some sanity to a law that is, by all insightful accounts, broken in its current form. It is also gratifying to have so many Democrats join in with the efforts to make common sense a part of the law. Chairman Pombo deserves a Congressional Medal of Persistence and Patience."

Rep. Cathy McMorris (R-WA):

"Today we took a big step forward in restoring common sense solutions to the ESA and helping our region's economy. This bill will help facilitate the relationship between protecting those species that are truly endangered and using our natural resources and our land. We have seen first hand the impact that the Endangered Species Act has had on our river systems in the Pacific Northwest. This bill will help us move away from litigation, lawsuits and punitive settlements, and allow us to better recover species by providing incentives, employing peer-reviewed standards data based on objective scientific practices, and compensating private property owners for lost use of land."

Rep. George Radanovich (R-CA):

"Today's Committee vote is an important step forward in our bipartisan effort to bring common sense back to the implementation of the Endangered Species Act. This much-needed legislation brings meaningful improvements to the Act by providing for the use of the best available scientific data in all decisions as well as including language that would better protect and recover species in need."

Rep. Greg Walden (R-OR):

"Our over-arching goal with this legislation is to make the law more successfully achieve the goals that were established 32 years ago when it was enacted, and I appreciate the support of the House Resources Committee through their approval today. These modest changes would bring tangible and positive results for the environment and the people we represent through improved scientific requirements in decision making, prioritization of species in need, protection of private property rights, and a streamlined process that will be open and accountable to the public."

Rep. Barbara Cubin (R-WY):

"We need to encourage private property owners to take part in the process. This bill provides incentives to private property owners to come to the table and it will force the federal government to respect the property rights of farmers, ranchers and landowners."

Rep. John Peterson (R-PA):

"I think most reasonable folks can agree that a thorough and careful update of the Act is a good thing, and will go a long way toward ensuring its future viability. I'm glad that after three decades we were finally able to deliver that update - influenced by established science, and guided by basic tenets of commonsense."

Rep. Jim Gibbons (R-NV):

"The current law is simply not working. A less than 1 percent recovery rate is unacceptable, and we can do better. This legislation will foster a more collaborative relationship between landowners, state governments, the federal government, and all other stakeholders to create effective recovery plans based on sound science. This collaborative process is necessary if we are going to truly protect and recover our endangered species."

3. DOMENICI ENCOURAGES INNOVATION WITH GROUP DEVELOPING ENERGY-WATER SOLUTIONS

Press Release from the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee

Contact: Erik Webb 505-346-6726

Date: 9/22/2005

Washington, D.C. - Senate Energy and Natural Resources Chairman Pete V. Domenici today encouraged innovation by a congressionally-authorized group that will attempt to create a "roadmap" for assuring sufficient energy and water in the future.

The group met for the first time Thursday in Washington. Domenici, who as Chairman of the Senate Appropriations subcommittee that funds the Energy Department and federal water programs, issued a message to the group, which includes representatives from twelve DOE national laboratories and a diverse group of water experts. Sandia National Laboratories is spearheading the effort.

"Energy and water are interdependent. We cannot have sufficient energy without having sufficient water. The reverse is also true. Drinking water and wastewater treatment are dependent on having the energy to pump, move and treat it," Domenici said. "This new roadmap initiative will require its participants to be innovative."

As part of the recently-enacted National Energy Policy Act of 2005, DOE was directed to research, develop, demonstrate and commercialize programs to address interdependent energy and water problems. Today's executive committee meeting represents the first step in the effort to develop a roadmap to carry out this mandate in cooperation with municipalities, industry and other organizations.

Domenici, through the Energy and Water Appropriations Subcommittee, has provided funding through Sandia National Laboratories to undertake the roadmapping effort that is expected to take about a year.

"The federal government has a responsibility to help find solutions for the future through research and development investments, including water efficiency and treatment technologies," Domenici said. "We are depleting our water supplies. Energy, agriculture, industry and municipal uses are all at risk. We must act now to ensure the supplies of the future."

DOE laboratories involved in this project include: Sandia National Laboratories (NM); Los Alamos National Laboratory (NM); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (CA); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (CA); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (CO); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (WA); Idaho National Laboratory (ID); Argonne National Laboratory (IL); National Energy Technology Laboratory (WV, PA, OK); Brookhaven National Laboratory (NY); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (TN); and Savannah River National Laboratory (SC).

4. RENZI PUSHES FOR IMPROVEMENTS TO ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT:

Changes Will Enlist Local Experts and Native Americans for Input on Law

Press Release from Rep. Rick Renzi

Contact: Joe Brenckle, 202-226-8273

Date: 9/22/2005

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Congressman Rick Renzi (AZ-1), a member of the House Resources Committee, today pushed for improvements to the Endangered Species Act. The House Resources Committee is holding hearings on a bill, H.R. 3824, the Threatened and Endangered Species Recovery Act of 2005 (TESRA), that would improve and update the Act to reflect strengths and weaknesses in the original measure. Congressman Renzi added two amendments to the measure which would require local experts and officials to be involved in the development of recovery plans.

"In the West, the Endangered Species Act has limited our ability to maintain the health of our forests and has placed unnecessary hardships on cattlemen, and other traditional Western ways of life," said Congressman Renzi. "The Endangered Species Act has created a system of red tape and vague regulations that not only threatens the well being of our lands, but handcuffs our communities, and jeopardizes the livelihood of private land owners."

Renzi's first amendment specifically calls for the inclusion of local entities in the recovery process after a species is considered endangered. Renzi noted the importance of utilizing local experts in order to establish pragmatic solutions that will lead to the recovery of listed species, while maintaining the overall health of the affected land and communities. Renzi's second amendment pushes to include Native American Tribes in the ESA process. Renzi said that Native Americans are the truest stewards of our lands and should be recognized as such. He said that the federal government ought to follow the example of the Native Americans, rather than handcuffing them with outdated regulations and controversial litigation.

"We must establish pragmatic solutions that provide protection to those species that truly are endangered," Renzi said. "But, we must permit government agencies to maintain the health of our natural resources. And we must allow our land to be utilized in reasonable and conservation-minded ways that will benefit the community overall."

AGENCY PRESS RELEASES:

5. NORTON ANNOUNCES FUNDING FOR WETLANDS PROJECTS, ADDITIONS TO NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGES

Press Release from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Contact: Nicholas Throckmorton, (202)208-5636

Date: 9/22/2005

Interior Secretary Gale Norton yesterday announced the Migratory Bird Conservation Commission has approved nearly $29 million for habitat conservation in the United States and Canada to benefit migratory birds. At the same time, the Commission also approved the acquisition of nearly 6,000 acres of important migratory bird habitat to be added to the National Wildlife Refuge System.

The Commission's action will fund grants to states and other partners through the North American Wetlands Conservation Act (NAWCA) to meet important habitat goals for migratory birds. The Commission also allocated revenue from the sale of the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp, the Duck Stamp, to purchase key tracts of land for the Service's National Wildlife Refuge System in three states.

Working with Partners to Conserve Wetlands

The NAWCA Standard Grants Program funded 25 projects with more than $24 million in 19 States to protect, restore or enhance more than 198,000 acres of wetlands and associated upland habitats in the United States. Project partners added nearly $97 million.

"Acre-by-acre, public and private partners are restoring wetlands across the nation," said Secretary Norton, who chairs the Commission. "Wetlands provide excellent habitat for wildlife and provide millions of Americans with a broad range of outdoor recreational opportunities."

Since 1990, more than 2,800 partners have been involved in more than 1,900 Act-supported projects in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. Partners must at least match the grant request dollar for dollar. Canadian and U.S. partners focus on long-term protection, restoration, or enhancement of critical habitats; Mexican partners also may develop training, management, and environmental education programs and conduct studies on sustainable use. In total, nearly $700 million in Act grants have been invested in the three countries. Partner contributions have amounted to $2.0 billion. Some 14 million acres of wetlands and associated uplands have been affected.

The Commission also approved nearly $5 million for 15 projects in Canada. Partners added nearly $10 million to achieve their conservation goals.

"Since many of North America's waterfowl species are dependent on breeding habitat in Canada, it is important that we use our NAWCA funds to conserve habitat there as well," said Acting Service Director Matt Hogan.

Funding for this program comes from Congressional appropriations, funds collected from fines, penalties, and forfeitures under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, interest accrued to the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act, and from excise taxes paid on small engine fuels through the Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration Act.

For more information, please see http://www.fws.gov/birdhabitat/NAWCA/nawccminutesJUL05.htm.

Federal Duck Stamp Revenues for National Wildlife Refuges.

Money raised by the sale of Federal Duck Stamps pays for wetland acquisitions for the National Wildlife Refuge System. Since the first Duck Stamp sale in 1934, more than $700 million has been raised for the Migratory Bird Conservation Fund. Money from the fund has purchased more than five million acres of wetlands for the refuge system.

Today, the Commission approved more than $5,897,703 from the Fund to acquire land for the National Wildlife Refuge System. All acquisitions were previously approved by the affected states.

New National Wildlife Refuge System acquisitions are:

Louisiana: Acquisition of 1,550 acres to protect wetland habitat for waterfowl to be added to Bayou Cocodrie National Wildlife Refuge in Concordia Parish.

Mississippi: Acquisition of 702 acres to protect bottomland habitat for wintering waterfowl and resident wood ducks to be added to Panther Swamp National Wildlife Refuge in Yazoo County.

Louisiana: Acquisition of 1,732 acres to be added to Red River National Wildlife Refuge in Caddo, Bossier, Desoto, Red River, and Natchitoches Parishes for protection and restoration wetland habitat.

Texas: Acquisition of 1,031 acres to provide wetland habitat for waterfowl to be added to San Bernard National Wildlife Refuge in Brazoria County.

Texas: Acquisition of 3 acres to protect wetland habitat to be added to Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge in Liberty County.

Louisiana: Acquisition of 160 acres to provide waterfowl habitat within the boundary of Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge in West Feliciana Parish.

Louisiana: Acquisition of 80 acres to preserve bottomland hardwood habitat for waterfowl within the boundary of Catahoula National Wildlife Refuge in Catahoula Parish.

Mississippi: Reauthorization of a 502 acre lease to protect wetland habitat for waterfowl within the boundary of St. Catherine Creek National Wildlife Refuge in Adams County.

The Migratory Bird Conservation Act of 1929 established the Migratory Bird Conservation Commission to approve land to be purchased for the National Wildlife Refuge System with monies from the Migratory Bird Conservation Fund. The fund is supported by revenue collected from Federal Duck Stamp sales, import duties collected on arms and ammunition, right-of-way payments to the refuge system, and receipts from national wildlife refuge entry fees. For more information about the Federal Duck Stamp program please visit http://duckstamps.fws.gov.

The Commission meets three times a year to approve funding proposals. Permanent Commission members are Interior Secretary Norton, Senators Thad Cochran and Blanche Lincoln; Representatives John Dingell and Curt Weldon; Secretary of Agriculture Mike Johanns; and EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the principal Federal agency responsible for conserving, protecting and enhancing fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. The Service manages the 95-million-acre National Wildlife Refuge System, which encompasses 545 national wildlife refuges, thousands of small wetlands and other special management areas. It also operates 69 national fish hatcheries, 63 fishery resources offices and 81 ecological services field stations. The agency enforces federal wildlife laws, administers the Endangered Species Act, manages migratory bird populations, restores nationally significant fisheries, conserves and restores wildlife habitat such as wetlands, and helps foreign governments with their conservation efforts. It also oversees the Federal Aid program, which distributes hundreds of millions of dollars in excise taxes on fishing and hunting equipment to state fish and wildlife agencies.

6. NATIONAL PUBLIC LANDS DAY ADVISORY (NPS DIRECTOR AND COMMISSIONER KEYS)

National Park Service Media Advisory

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: SEPTEMBER 22, 2005 David Barna (202) 208-6843 Bill

Line (202) 619-7177

WASHINGTON, D.C. --- Fran P. Mainella, Director of the National Park Service, will take part in a special event to be held at Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens in commemoration of National Public Lands Day. National Public Lands Day is the nation's largest hands-on volunteer effort to improve and enhance the public lands that Americans enjoy. Director Mainella will kick-off the event from the park visitor center and then pitch-in with more than 150 volunteers on projects to remove invasive and exotic plants, prune trees and weed flower beds, and remove liter from the marshes.

WHO: Fran Mainella, Director, National Park Service

John Keys, Commissioner, Bureau of Reclamation

WHAT: National Public Lands Day Special Event/Media Opportunity.

WHEN: Saturday, September 24, 2005, from 9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

WHERE: Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens - the only national park "devoted entirely to water loving plants" is located in northeast Washington, D.C., near the Maryland boundary along the tidal Anacostia River. The entrance to the Aquatic Gardens is just west of I-295 (Kenilworth Avenue), between Quarles and Douglas Streets, on Anacostia Avenue.

EVENT CO-SPONSORED BY: National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA). NPCA has co-sponsored National Public Lands Day at Kenilworth for five consecutive years.

NEWS ARTICLES:

7. REWRITE OF ENDANGERED SPECIES LAW APPROVED

House to Vote Soon; Senate Could in 2006

By Juliet Eilperin

Washington Post Staff Writer

Friday, September 23, 2005; A02

Setting the stage for the most sweeping restructuring of endangered species protections in three decades, the House Resources Committee yesterday approved legislation that would strengthen the hand of private property owners and make it harder for federal officials to set aside large swaths of habitat for imperiled plants and animals.

Committee Chairman Richard W. Pombo (R-Calif.), who has sought to revamp the Endangered Species Act for more than a decade, said the bill would make the landmark 32-year-old law more effective.

"The whole underlying premise of what we're trying to do is recover species," Pombo said, adding that his measure would ensure "individual property owners are not forced to shoulder the financial burden of conserving endangered species for all Americans."

For the remainder of this article see: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/09/22/AR2005092202099.html.

8. THE BATTLE BEGINS OVER ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT

Environmentalists say revisions could weaken safeguards

By CHARLES POPE AND LISA STIFFLER

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER REPORTERS

Thursday, September 22, 2005

WASHINGTON -- The battle lines over changing the Endangered Species Act came into clear view on Capitol Hill Wednesday during a House hearing on a bill that, if approved, would make the most significant changes in the act in 32 years.

The bill, written by California Republican Rep. Richard Pombo, aims to realize many of the goals sought by landowners and other critics who say the act is burdensome, bureaucratic and ineffective. They also decry the way the law limits the use of private property.

Democratic lawmakers and environmental groups have blasted the proposal, saying it would dramatically weaken safeguards for the nation's most vulnerable plants and animals.

For the remainder of this article see: http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/national/241710_endangered22.html.

9. WOMEN IN COASTAL AREAS ARE FOUND TO HAVE HIGHER MERCURY LEVELS

By Juliet Eilperin

Washington Post Staff Writer

Friday, September 23, 2005; A03

Women in coastal communities have twice as much mercury in their blood as those living inland, according to an analysis by an Environmental Protection Agency scientist.

The preliminary findings, based on a survey of 3,600 women conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention between 1999 and 2002, provide fresh evidence of the link between fish consumption and concentrations of methylmercury, a neurotoxin that causes developmental problems in young children.

The study focused on the 10 percent of women with the highest mercury levels, and in that group, it found that inland residents had an average level of 2.4 parts per billion, compared with 5.9 parts per billion for coastal residents. EPA guidelines hold that mercury levels higher than 3.5 parts per billion pose a possible health threat.

For the remainder of this article see: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/09/22/AR2005092201899.html.

10. TOMORROW MARKS THAT THIS LAND IS YOUR LAND

Volunteers Converge on 750 Sites for Cleanup

By T.R. Reid

Washington Post Staff Writer

Friday, September 23, 2005; A21

From Alaska to the Everglades, from Maine to Maui, the United States comprises more than 2 billion acres of real estate. And one out of every three of those acres belongs to you.

As a nation that never had a monarchy, the U.S.A. has no royal preserves set aside for the king and his cronies. Since the birth of the republic, rather, any land not privately claimed has been held in trust for the American people. Today, the nation's public lands range from the tiny rings of green around traffic circles in Washington, D.C., to the Wrangell-St. Elias Wilderness in Alaska, a 9 million-acre swath of tundra that is the biggest single public parcel.

For the remainder of this article see: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/09/22/AR2005092201909.html.

11. WHO YOU REALLY WANT RUNNING A FEDERAL AGENCY

The Washington Post

Friday, September 23, 2005; A21

Many career federal managers have always had a quiet disdain for their politically appointed counterparts. A new Princeton University study suggests they may be justified in that view.

The career guys make, well, careers of their time in federal service, building expertise in their agencies and rarely getting public recognition. The politicals, on the other hand, blow into an agency for a year or two, reinventing wheels and implementing "new paradigms," and then leave declaring the bureaucracy to be better than they found it.

It turns out that the career managers, on average, do a better job of running federal agencies than the political appointees do. So says a 41-page study by political scientist David E. Lewis of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

For the remainder of this article see: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/09/22/AR2005092201980.html.

12. PAYING FOR KATRINA

TODAY'S EDITORIAL

The Washington Times

September 23, 2005

Congress already has passed $62.3 billion in Katrina-related emergency appropriations, and the White House has informed Capitol Hill that more money will be needed in October. Speculation about the next request centers on another $50 billion, while Katrina's total cost could exceed $200 billion.

Before Katrina stuck, the mid-session review of the White House Office of Management and Budget projected deficits of $333 billion in fiscal 2005, which ends Sept. 30, and $341 billion for fiscal 2006, which begins Oct. 1. If fiscal business-as-usual was dangerous before Katrina, then in a post-Katrina world it is undeniably disastrous. Yet, no less than House Majority Leader Tom DeLay was initially in denial. In the wake of the $62.3 billion in emergency appropriations for Katrina, Mr. DeLay said that the Republican-controlled Congress had already removed the fat from the federal budget. "My answer to those who want to offset [Katrina] spending is, 'Sure, bring me the offsets,' " he said. "I will be glad to do it, but no one is able come up with any yet."

For the remainder of this article see: http://www.washtimes.com/op-ed/20050922-094105-2806r.htm.

13. "GLOBAL WARMING" FORCING WESTERNERS TO ADAPT

By Katy Human

Denver Post Staff Writer

DenverPost.com

Article Last Updated: 9/22/2005 01:37 AM

Drought already has reshaped the West, and hot, dry weather will continue to change life in the region, according to a new analysis of Western weather patterns.

"Global warming is underway in the West," said Stephen Saunders, president of the year-old Rocky Mountain Climate Organization and lead author of the report released Wednesday.

"These disruptions threaten the quality of life we all enjoy," Saunders said.

For the remainder of this article see: http://www.denverpost.com/search/ci_3050278.

14. NEXT PHASE IN PROTECTING SPECIES: LIVING WITH THEM

Large predator populations are growing across the US, raising concerns over how to manage healthy biodiversity.

By Brad Knickerbocker | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor

September 22, 2005

ASHLAND, ORE. The Rogue Valley in southern Oregon is normally a mellow, small-town place where the major commercial export is Harry and David's fancy fruits and most of the violence comes at the hand of Richard III onstage at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. But lately, people have been keeping an eye out for predators on the prowl - not criminals, but tooth-and-claw types a critical notch above humans on the food chain.

Dog walkers out for an evening stroll have spotted cougars in the town park. Pets and livestock have been mauled or sometimes killed. In the eastern part of the state, gray wolves from the wilds of Idaho have occasionally emigrated across the border, worrying ranchers and others.

For the remainder of this article see: http://www.csmonitor.com/2005/0922/p03s01-uspo.html.




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